Taking Care of Business – 21st Century Style

file221263244327Following are some keen gleanings, amusing musings, and plain common sense for women over 40 who get a lot done – with and for other people, taking care of themselves, their teams and their businesses.  These are culled from workshops I’ve run recently for professionals over 40, classroom exchanges I’ve had with business students in various universities, and “heard on the street” revelations that surprise even someone more over 40 than I want to admit!

 1) In today’s workplace, karma is as karma does.  If your default leadership mode now that you’re over 40 is to be all dictatorial diva and command-and-control queen, then you’re practicing the outmoded, discredited management principles of the 19th century.   What worked in the factory-driven Industrial Revolution (or in The Devil Wears Prada) is negatively Neanderthal in this environment of self-actualization and self-driven career professionals.  Team disenchantment that’s allowed to fester leads to massive defections, operations challenges, and external backlash.  If you’re “that guy,” keep in mind this commonsense advice from a variety of leadership experts: 

a) Learn to analyze complex team situations – because no one management theory works for all employees in all industries or companies.

b) Develop a broad repertoire of behaviors and knowledge about when to use them – focusing on optimizing your team’s strengths, rather than focusing on their weaknesses.

c) Develop the self-control and self-discipline to go beyond your natural leadership style and adapt to a rapidly changing environment – not everything is a “turnaround” situation. 

 harvard bus review2) Learn how to manage yourself, and manage how you learn, before you can hope to manage others – including the leaders to whom you report.  A classic Peter Drucker article about how we learn is even more relevant today than when it was published 15 years ago in the Harvard Business Review.  I assign it to students as well as professionals over 40, because Drucker demonstrates:

 a) your preferred ways of learning drive whether you consume and process information efficiently and effectively;
b) you take subsequent actions based on how you learn, and therefore, what you think you know;
c) those actions govern the responses you’re likely to receive (pro and con) from your direct reports as well as your own management;
d) if you’re not learning anymore, it means you’re bored, and if you’re bored, your job is on the line.    

 3) Should leaders focus on frenetic output and efficiency no matter the company or situation?  Or, should they build in time for thoughtful consideration, reflection and resetting of strategies, desired outcomes and potential impacts?  Recent media stories skew bipolar for both sides: 

social media logosa) The camp that says we’re battling insomnia because we’re multi-tasking, pinging, Tweeting, Linking, Facing, and Pinteresting well beyond reasonable latte hours – BUT we ALL should be getting a “minimum” of seven hours of sleep.  Here, please note that mattress manufacturers, sleep app marketers and pharmaceutical companies create a lot of this “reportage” because they’re only too happy to push worry and “remedies” to those of us who sleep six or fewer hours a night, and we do just fine without new mattresses, rain simulators or sleep drugs.      

sleepb) The camp that loves the cliché that “Sleep is vastly overrated.”  That cliché should be relegated to the Industrial Revolution and its outmoded factory management techniques, in any case.  Its proselytizers are supposed gurus of how to get more done, all of it!, most of it!, work!, play! – in four or fewer hours a week, supposedly with games, virtual assistants, and gargantuan gulps of 20-ounce cups of Coke.   Phew – who has time to dump all that Coke, let alone sleep!

c) Try this instead – the antidote to all this frenzy!  Tony Schwartz’s Life@Work column that ran on Valentine’s Day in the New York Times, extolled the virtues of purposely building in time in our day to be offline, rather than off and running, unless you’re using that run as time to think and reflect.  That kind of deep, insightful, refreshing, brain-cleansing reflection focuses us on several important priorities: 1) what we truly need and want to accomplish, 2) when such activity really needs to be done, and – 3) here’s the wakeup call for many of us who think we’re indispensable – does it absolutely, positively, need to be done by YOU?   Read the article

If you’re a leader over 40 and you’ve been “taking care of business – and working overtime,” remember that song was recorded back in the 1970s – even if it did briefly surface again in the 1990s!  Wake up, it’s a new century!  Time to give some deep thought to your default management style, its impact on your  team and your management, and whether you need to be offline thinking more than you’re overtime working.